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What's Hot - Adult Non-Fiction


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Most circulated items in Adult Non-Fiction in last 6 months.

Click on the title or the author to view item or author in the library catalogue.

  1. For decades, we’ve been told that positive thinking is the key to a happy, rich life. "F**k positivity," Mark Manson says. "Let’s be honest, shit is f**ked and we have to live with it." In his wildly popular Internet blog, Manson doesn’t sugarcoat or equivocate. He tells it like it is—a dose of raw, refreshing, honest truth that is sorely lacking today. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F**k is his antidote to the coddling, let’s-all-feel-good mindset that has infected modern society and spoiled a generation, rewarding them with gold medals just for showing up.

    Manson makes the...

  2. Other books will tell you how to be hygge. This is the only book that will show you. Though we all know the feeling of hygge instinctively, few of us ever manage to capture it for more than a moment. Now Danish actress and hygge aficionado Marie Tourell Søderberg has traveled the length and breadth of her home country to create the perfect guide to cooking, decorating, entertaining, and being inspired the hygge way. Full of beautiful photographs and simple, practical steps and ideas to make your home and life both comfortable and cheering all year round, this book is the easy way to...

  3. Taking the counsel of Hippocrates—"Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food"—acclaimed author David Wolfe brings the wisdom of eating herbal medicine to today's health-conscious readers. His enthusiastic fan base, which includes celebrities such as Woody Harrelson and Angela Bassett, continues to blossom as more and more people realize the healing and immunity-boosting properties of raw and medicinal foods.

    In Chaga, Wolfe presents the many virtues of medicinal mushrooms, which boost immunity, stave off allergies and asthma, help fight against cancer, and generally improve...

  4. A five-point plan to usher you through heartache and toward a stronger, healthier place.

    “I know how to kill someone and get away with it.” The words spoken by her father when Melissa was a teen haunt her to this day. Two years later, after confessing that he was the serial killer nationally known as the Happy Face Killer, Keith Jesperson was arrested for the murder of eight women. The pain, guilt, and shame that followed her father’s conviction stigmatized Melissa for years until she figured out a way to use her emotions as fuel to free herself from self-imposed limits and set out...

  5. When Sharon Butala’s husband, Peter, died unexpectedly, she found herself with no place to call home. Torn by grief and loss, she fled the ranchlands of southwest Saskatchewan and moved to the city, leaving almost everything behind. A lifetime of possessions was reduced to a few boxes of books, clothes, and keepsakes. But a lifetime of experience went with her, and a limitless well of memory—of personal failures, of a marriage that everybody said would not last but did, of the unbreakable bonds of family.

    Reinventing herself in an urban landscape was painful, and facing her new life...

  6. An age of chivalry, color, and faith from which the modern world still draws inspiration--or centuries of violence, squalor, and superstition best forgotten? Marjorie Rowling refreshingly avoids any such extreme judgments so often passed on the Middle Ages. Instead, she looks closely at some of the people who lived and worked in that fascinating era of European history.

    These men and women are drawn from all classes and occupations: The serf and his family stealing a day off work to go to the fair are as vividly described as the lord and his lady in their newly built keep of stone....

  7. From the 1920s to 1952, George and Else Seel lived about sixty kilometres south of Burns Lake near the small farming settlement of Wistaria on the western shore of Ootsa Lake. Like many early twentieth century settlers who migrated to BC’s Central Interior, the Seels came in search of opportunity and prosperity, but the harsh environment posed challenges they could not have imagined. The community was remote and the winters were long, but eventually, along with their fellow settlers, they learned how to live and thrive in this new world. They developed a close connection to the land;...

  8. n The Inconvenient Indian, Thomas King offers a deeply knowing, darkly funny, unabashedly opinionated, and utterly unconventional account of Indian–White relations in North America since initial contact. Ranging freely across the centuries and the Canada–U.S. border, King debunks fabricated stories of Indian savagery and White heroism, takes an oblique look at Indians (and cowboys) in film and popular culture, wrestles with the history of Native American resistance and his own experiences as a Native rights activist, and articulates a profound, revolutionary understanding of the cumulative...

  9. At long last, the owner of New York City's legendary Fat Witch Bakery shares her top-secret recipes for decadent and delicious brownies, blondies, and bars

    Patricia Helding's rich, intensely chocolatey Fat Witch brownie is a New York obsession, an internet sensation, and arguably the very best brownie to be found on the planet. Unlike other bakeries that feature a range of desserts, Fat Witch, launched by Helding in 1998, specializes only in brownies―baking and selling over 2,000 each day. In Fat Witch Brownies, Helding showcases for the first time her favorite spins on the classic...

  10. “Is it the world that’s busy, or is it my mind?”

    The world moves fast, but that doesn’t mean we have to. In this bestselling mindfulness guide—it has sold more than three million copies in Korea, where it was a #1 bestseller for forty-one weeks and received multiple Best Book of the Year awards, and it's being published in more than 25 countries—Haemin Sunim (which means “spontaneous wisdom”), a renowned Buddhist meditation teacher born in Korea and educated in the United States, illuminates a path to inner peace and balance amid the overwhelming demands of everyday life.

    By...

  11. Anxiety for Beginners offers a vivid insight into the often crippling impact of anxiety disorders, a condition that is frequently invisible, shrouded in shame and misunderstood. It serves as a guide for those who live with anxiety disorders and those who live with them by proxy.

    Combining her own experiences (rendered in emotive detail) with extensive research with experts (neuroscientists, psychiatrists, psychologists and fellow sufferers - including some familiar faces), Eleanor Morgan explores not just the roots of her own anxiety, but also investigates what might be contributing...

  12. What is the difference between having empathy and being an empath? “Having empathy means our heart goes out to another person in joy or pain,” says Dr. Judith Orloff. “But for empaths it goes much further. We actually feel others’ emotions, energy, and physical symptoms in our own bodies, without the usual defenses that most people have.” The Empath’s Survival Guide is an invaluable resource for empaths and anyone who wants to nurture their empathy and develop coping skills in our high-stimulus world—while fully embracing their gifts of intuition, compassion, creativity, and spiritual...

  13. With her first cookbook, But I Could Never Go Vegan!, Kristy Turner deliciously refuted every common excuse to prove that, yes, anyone can go vegan. Now, But My Family Would Never Eat Vegan! serves up 125 all-new, scrumptious, satisfying recipes—organized around 20 too-familiar objections to eating vegan as a family:
    Don't have time to cook elaborate family dinners? Whip up an easy weeknight solution: Quick Cauliflower Curry, BBQ Chickpea Salad, or Cheesy Quinoa & Veggies.
    Worried about satisfying the "meat and potatoes" eaters? Wow them with Lazy Vegan Chile Relleno...

  14. Each day we face a barrage of images and messages from society and the media telling us who, what, and how we should be. We are led to believe that if we could only look perfect and lead perfect lives, we'd no longer feel inadequate. So most of us perform, please, and perfect, all the while thinking, "What if I can't keep all of these balls in the air? Why isn't everyone else working harder and living up to my expectations? What will people think if I fail or give up? When can I stop proving myself?"

    In her ten guideposts, Brown engages our minds, hearts, and spirits as she explores...

  15. Nobel Peace Prize Laureates His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu have survived more than fifty years of exile and the soul-crushing violence of oppression. Despite their hardships—or, as they would say, because of them—they are two of the most joyful people on the planet.

    In April 2015, Archbishop Tutu traveled to the Dalai Lama's home in Dharamsala, India, to celebrate His Holiness's eightieth birthday and to create what they hoped would be a gift for others. They looked back on their long lives to answer a single burning question: How do we find joy in the face...

  16. From the knife fights and smuggling runs of his youth to his fiery days as a pioneering naval aviator, Paul Irving "Pappy" Gunn played by his own set of rules and always survived on his wits and fists. But when he fell for a conservative Southern belle, her love transformed him from a wild and reckless airman to a cunning entrepreneur whose homespun engineering brilliance helped launch one of the first airlines in Asia.

    Pappy was drafted into MacArthur's air force when war came to the Philippines; and while he carried out a top-secret mission to Australia, the Japanese seized his...

  17. It's time to get off the beaten path. Inspiring equal parts wonder and wanderlust, Atlas Obscura celebrates over 700 of the strangest and most curious places in the world.

    Talk about a bucket list: here are natural wonders—the dazzling glowworm caves in New Zealand, or a baobob tree in South Africa that's so large it has a pub inside where 15 people can drink comfortably. Architectural marvels, including the M.C. Escher-like stepwells in India. Mind-boggling events, like the Baby Jumping Festival in Spain, where men dressed as devils literally vault over rows of squirming infants....

  18. An enduring dream for many people, regardless of where they live in modern times, is that of living in the country, raising food and livestock, being partially or fully self-sustaining, and working directly with the land. In Country Life, Heiney shows the reader what's involved in turning that dream into some kind of reality, working on the basic premise that anyone with the will to do it can bring at least a small portion of home farming into his life, even if it means starting with a small window box in the middle of the city. He presents the basics of home farming, care of livestock,...

  19. Why is it that we read? Is it to pass time? To learn something new? To escape from reality? For Will Schwalbe, reading is a way to entertain himself but also to make sense of the world, to become a better person, and to find the answers to the big (and small) questions about how to live his life. In this delightful celebration of reading, Schwalbe invites us along on his quest for books that speak to the specific challenges of living in our modern world, with all its noise and distractions. In each chapter, he discusses a particular book—what brought him to it (or vice versa), the people...